Oakville Images
Tulip Tree Glen Abbey


Description
Full Text

We were looking for examples of large, native trees in our area and found this healthy specimen just up the street.


Media Type:
Image
Description:
Liriodendron /ˌlaɪriəˈdɛndrən, ˌlɪr-, -ioʊ-/ is a genus of two species of characteristically large deciduous trees in the magnolia family. Another name for this tree is Yellow Popular. Found in Oakville, ON but also many other places in North America, including Ohio and Kentucky. The wood is soft and weak, but is very easily worked, and has many uses. Early settlers used the wood extensively in building, and made home remedies from the inner bark of the roots. Bees make honey from the blossoms, and various wildlife eat the fruit and twigs. from : http://www.oplin.org/tree/fact%20pages/tulip_tree/tulip_tree.html
Subject(s):
Donor:
Leslie Sutherland
Copyright Statement:
Protected by copyright: Uses other than research or private study require the permission of the rightsholder(s). Responsibility for obtaining permissions and for any use rests exclusively with the user.
Contact
Oakville Public Library
Email
WWW address

Agency street/mail address

Oakville Public Library

Central Branch

120 Navy Street

Oakville ON L6J 2Z4

Tel: (905) 815-2042

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Tulip Tree Glen Abbey
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Tulip Tree Glen Abbey


Liriodendron /ˌlaɪriəˈdɛndrən, ˌlɪr-, -ioʊ-/ is a genus of two species of characteristically large deciduous trees in the magnolia family. Another name for this tree is Yellow Popular. Found in Oakville, ON but also many other places in North America, including Ohio and Kentucky. The wood is soft and weak, but is very easily worked, and has many uses. Early settlers used the wood extensively in building, and made home remedies from the inner bark of the roots. Bees make honey from the blossoms, and various wildlife eat the fruit and twigs. from : http://www.oplin.org/tree/fact%20pages/tulip_tree/tulip_tree.html