Oakville Images
Letter from William "Bill" Banting to Friends of Diabetes Research


Description
Media Type:
Image
Item Type:
Documents
Description:
Letter from Bill Banting, son of Sir Frederick Banting, to "Friends of Diabetes Research". The text reads:

Dear friend of Diabetes research,


My father asked more of himself than others.


Anxious to give his first year medical students a synopsis of the latest research, he thought his lecture wasn't good enough.


To do a better job, he took his medical journals to bed with him. Hours later, rising from a sleep, he scribbled down a brief paragraph that would lead to the discovery of insulin.


That was the night of October 30th, seventy-four years ago and how my father's name was first associated with Diabetes Research. He concieved the idea of isolating insulin in his house in London Ontario. Today that house is the Banting Museum and Education Centre. I visited there this spring on the eve of my father's induction to the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame. For the first time, I saw where the concept was first sparked that took him to the dramatic breakthrough at the labs at the University of Toronto.


My work has taken me across five continents, but meeting the volunteers at the Canadian Diabetes Association was a defining moment of my life.


I discovered that their dedicated energy makes the world a better place for people with Diabetes.


When I was born, my father was 38. He died a month before my 12th birthday. He was 49. He was raised a farm boy, and the country was in his bones. He showed me how to make a whistle from a willow twig -- where to look for four leaf clovers, and which bird sang that song. This was valuable stuff for a young boy to get from his dad.


His biographers will tell you that he could be headstrong and stubborn and a very difficult man to cross. But he was also fiercely loyal to his friends, colleagues, and war comerades. My father was also kind and gentle -- especially with animals and children -- who loved him. (continues on back)


He recieved grateful letters from thousands of children with diabetes which he would read, late at night, with soft tears in his eyes. He knew insulin was not a cure.


As World War II approached, he re-joined the army and I saw less of him. One night in early 1941 he came home and asked me to come to his study with him. Invitations to his study usually meant trouble, but this time it was different.


He quietly told me he was going to Britain on war buisness, and that it was a secret. I was to work hard at school and help with the chores. The next morning he left for Ottawa to catch his plane.


He never came back.


In front of the house where my father conceived the idea for insulin -- a flame burns from a cairn. It is called the flame of hope, and on the day a cure is found for diabetes, it will be extinguished.


With your support harnessed to the all-out efforts of dedicated researchers -- the lives of men, women, and children will be made better -- and eventually a cure will surely be found.


If my father were here, I know he would cheer your good work by supporting the Canadian Diabetes Association.


Bill Banting.

Notes:
Based on the tone of the letter, "Friends of Diabetes Research" are presumably volunteers with and/or donors to the Canadian Diabetes Association.
Date of Original:
1994
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
OIBA0001
Geographic Coverage:
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 42.98339 Longitude: -81.23304
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
Contact
Oakville Public Library
Email
WWW address
Agency street/mail address

Oakville Public Library

Central Branch

120 Navy Street

Oakville ON L6J 2Z4

Tel: (905) 815-2042

For information about photographs, news articles, or other information included in this database, please contact the Local Collections Librarian by email.

Powered by / Alimenté par VITA Toolkit




My favourites lets you save items you like, tag them and group them into collections for your own personal use. Viewing "My favourites" will open in a new tab. Login here or start a My favourites account.










Letter from William "Bill" Banting to Friends of Diabetes Research


Letter from Bill Banting, son of Sir Frederick Banting, to "Friends of Diabetes Research". The text reads:

Dear friend of Diabetes research,


My father asked more of himself than others.


Anxious to give his first year medical students a synopsis of the latest research, he thought his lecture wasn't good enough.


To do a better job, he took his medical journals to bed with him. Hours later, rising from a sleep, he scribbled down a brief paragraph that would lead to the discovery of insulin.


That was the night of October 30th, seventy-four years ago and how my father's name was first associated with Diabetes Research. He concieved the idea of isolating insulin in his house in London Ontario. Today that house is the Banting Museum and Education Centre. I visited there this spring on the eve of my father's induction to the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame. For the first time, I saw where the concept was first sparked that took him to the dramatic breakthrough at the labs at the University of Toronto.


My work has taken me across five continents, but meeting the volunteers at the Canadian Diabetes Association was a defining moment of my life.


I discovered that their dedicated energy makes the world a better place for people with Diabetes.


When I was born, my father was 38. He died a month before my 12th birthday. He was 49. He was raised a farm boy, and the country was in his bones. He showed me how to make a whistle from a willow twig -- where to look for four leaf clovers, and which bird sang that song. This was valuable stuff for a young boy to get from his dad.


His biographers will tell you that he could be headstrong and stubborn and a very difficult man to cross. But he was also fiercely loyal to his friends, colleagues, and war comerades. My father was also kind and gentle -- especially with animals and children -- who loved him. (continues on back)


He recieved grateful letters from thousands of children with diabetes which he would read, late at night, with soft tears in his eyes. He knew insulin was not a cure.


As World War II approached, he re-joined the army and I saw less of him. One night in early 1941 he came home and asked me to come to his study with him. Invitations to his study usually meant trouble, but this time it was different.


He quietly told me he was going to Britain on war buisness, and that it was a secret. I was to work hard at school and help with the chores. The next morning he left for Ottawa to catch his plane.


He never came back.


In front of the house where my father conceived the idea for insulin -- a flame burns from a cairn. It is called the flame of hope, and on the day a cure is found for diabetes, it will be extinguished.


With your support harnessed to the all-out efforts of dedicated researchers -- the lives of men, women, and children will be made better -- and eventually a cure will surely be found.


If my father were here, I know he would cheer your good work by supporting the Canadian Diabetes Association.


Bill Banting.